Discover the Ultimate Guide: Who Qualifies to Sponsor a Family-Based Green Card?

U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents (green card holders) can sponsor certain family members for a family-based green card. The eligible relatives include spouses, children, parents, and siblings, depending on the sponsor’s immigration status.

Read on for more information

US citizens and lawful permanent residents, also known as green card holders, are allowed to sponsor certain family members for a family-based green card. The eligible relatives include spouses, children, parents, and siblings, depending on the sponsor’s immigration status.

Family-based immigration is an important aspect of US immigration policy, providing a way for US citizens and green card holders to bring their family members to live and work in the country. Let’s delve into more detail about who can sponsor family-based green cards:

  1. US Citizens:

  2. Immediate Relatives: US citizens can sponsor their immediate relatives, including spouses, parents, and unmarried children under the age of 21.

  3. Preference Categories: US citizens can also sponsor other family members, such as married children, unmarried children over the age of 21, and siblings. However, these categories fall under the preference system, which means there may be limits on the number of visas available each year for these categories.

  4. Lawful Permanent Residents (Green Card Holders):

  5. Spouses and Unmarried Children: Green card holders can sponsor their spouses and unmarried children of any age.

  6. Preference Categories: Green card holders can also sponsor their unmarried children over the age of 21, but this falls under the preference system and may have limitations based on visa availability. However, green card holders cannot sponsor their parents or siblings for a family-based green card.
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One interesting fact about family-based green cards is that there are numerical limits on how many visas can be issued each year, especially in the preference categories. This is to manage the demand and ensure fairness in the immigration process.

Additionally, it’s important to note that sponsorship for a family-based green card involves a thorough application process, including providing evidence of the family relationship, financial support, and other supporting documents.

To quote the US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) website, “The Family Green Card category is a way for US citizens and green card holders to reunite with their family members and help them become lawful permanent residents in the United States.”

Here’s a table summarizing who US citizens and green card holders can sponsor for a family-based green card:

Sponsor’s Immigration Status Eligible Family Members
US Citizen Spouse, children, parents, siblings
Green Card Holder Spouse, unmarried children, some dependents

In conclusion, the ability to sponsor a family-based green card is a privilege granted to US citizens and green card holders. It allows them to bring their immediate family members to join them in the United States. This process plays a crucial role in family reunification and promoting a diverse and inclusive society in the US.

Answer in video

In this YouTube video, immigration lawyer Jim Hacking provides a comprehensive explanation of who green card holders can sponsor. Green card holders can sponsor their children and spouse, regardless of their age. However, they cannot sponsor their parents or other family members. The process is different for green card holders who obtained their green card through marriage, as they can sponsor their children if they are under 21 years old or over 21 years old. Green card holders typically need to wait until they become U.S. citizens to sponsor their brothers, sisters, or parents. Hacking also advises that if a green card holder is married to a U.S. citizen and wants to sponsor their child who is overseas, it may be faster to have the U.S. citizen spouse file separate applications for the spouse and the child, rather than waiting for the green card holder to obtain their green card first. He suggests seeking further information and assistance through their YouTube channel or Facebook group.

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Some further responses to your query

A U.S. citizen can sponsor the following relatives for an immigrant visa as a legal permanent resident (LPR), also called a green card holder: • a spouse or fiancé (e) • a parent • a sibling • an unmarried minor child under 21 years old • an adult child (regardless of marital status)

The spouse and unmarried children under the age of 21 of legal permanent residents (Green Card holders) To sponsor your family member, submit a United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Form I-130. Each person you sponsor needs a separate Form I-130. You can submit the form online or by mail.

U.S. citizens may sponsor the following family members:

  • A spouse
  • An unmarried child under the age of 21
  • A parent (if the citizen is over the age of 21)
  • A married child of any age

Whoever files Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative, on behalf of a family member (or Form I-129F on behalf of a fiancé) must also agree to be the financial sponsor and file Form I-864, Affidavit of Support, when the time comes for the person to actually apply for a green card. If this person does not have a sufficient income, there are options.

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